The Golden Age of Hollywood: Crash Course Film History #11

It’s time for the glitz and the glamour of big motion pictures that helped keep American spirits up during and after the Great Depression. Sound was a huge change to motion pictures, but there were still a few technological innovations to come, like color and aspect ration. Today, Craig walks us through the Golden Age of Hollywood.

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21 COMMENTS

  1. Just a slight correction, Technicolor was actually replaced in the 50s with 1 roll color film, that uses 3 layers of color/light sensitive material on 1 role, not 3 separate ones. Which would mean that you can put it in the same camera as you use for black and white film, which was waaaay smaller than a Technicolor camera. And THAT technology was used until digital.

  2. I know this is already three years old, but someone needs to point out that Mr. Benzine leaves out the most common film aspect ratio used for fifty years (pre-digital), while incorrectly asserting that most movies were made in the widescreen/anamorphic/2.35:1 aspect ratio. This is simply not true. That shape (and the lenses it requires) was reserved for spectacles and big action films (with slightly bigger budgets), while all the dramas and comedies (constituting the majority of studio releases) were being made in the most common aspect ratio of all, the one that's never mentioned here: 1.85:1. Early on Benzine refers to 16:9, but not only is this a term that was never referred to before the late nineties/early 2000s, its equivalent is 1.77:1, which is not a film format at all. It is, however, close enough to 16:9 that movies shot in 1.85:1 either lose a little bit of image on the right and left, gain a very thin letterbox top and bottom, or (say it ain't so!) get slightly squeezed. But given the dominance of 1.85:1 material out there, it strikes me as bad form to never mention it.

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